Spooky Short Stories for Halloween

Edgar Allan Poe book with skullEeps, Halloween is fast approaching! Are you in the mood for some spooky reading? In years past, our book group has read some good books for Halloween: Dracula, Frankenstein, Phantom of the Opera, and The Jungle to name a few. My favorites, though, are the short stories we’ve read. Just because a story is short doesn’t mean it can’t leave a haunting impact. These are my favorites:

“Graves for the Living” from Nightwebs by Cornell Woolrich (1937): This one has it all–secret societies, paranoia, fear of being buried alive–such a good one for Halloween week. The fifty pages turn quickly and you find yourself gasping for air and being suspicious of everyone! Woolrich also wrote the short story “It Had To Be Murder which became Alfred Hitchcock’s famous movie Rear Window.

“The Apple Tree” from The Birds & Other Stories by Daphne du Maurier (1952): We inched outside of our “pre-1930s” restrictions for this one and it was worth it. A man is “haunted” by his dead wife in the form of an apple tree on his property. “The Birds,” another story-to-Hitchcock movie favorite is included in this collection.

“The Monkey’s Paw” from The Lady of the Barge by W. W. Jacobs (1902): Three wishes on a mummified monkey’s paw…what could go wrong? This was named one of the scariest short stories of all time and I would have to agree!

“The Murders in the Rue Morgue” by Edgar Allan Poe (1841): It’s the first modern detective story, but it has enough mystery and suspense to be a great “ghost story” too! Anything from Poe works this time of year though, right?

What creepy stories have you read lately?

P.S. Totally unrelated: Happy Anniversary to my parents, celebrating 42 years today!! (Here’s a picture of them on their wedding day!)

Tagged , ,

One thought on “Spooky Short Stories for Halloween

  1. […] a good “ghost story” this time of year. I highly recommend “Afterward” and this post has some other great suggestions if you’re into Halloween […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: